Malta

The heat is on in Malta and I am back North

August is the hottest month in Malta. It’s the time when public life falls into a long rest between noon and 4 p.m. and then gets to the feasts. So did I, and I relaxed a lot. Not much to do, so not much done and here just a few snapshots and impressions from the short ways in Valletta and the Three Cities. By the time I post this, I am already out of holiday mood again and facing a rigoros schedule of content and travel: Germany, Netherlands, Hong Kong, Germany, Russia, and a few small Trips between the lines. Even Hong Kong will be chilly against August in Malta.

Evening view over to the Old Bakery, which is now hosting the Malta Maritime Museum

Evening view over to the Old Bakery, which is now hosting the Malta Maritime Museum

processed_IMG_20190802_155559.jpg
processed_IMG_20190731_101636.jpg
processed_IMG_20190728_172316.jpg

Two touch downs in Malta within 8 Minutes

Touched down in Malta twice today, as the first landing was aborted. All went safely, but a good reminder that it always is necessary to close safety belts tightly and stow away things that can fly around in such a procedure, or others. 

First attempt to land in Luqa...

First attempt to land in Luqa...

... and the second one a few minutes later.

... and the second one a few minutes later.

Malva tea and GDP

About from an annual GDP growth rate of 5% people appear to become wasteful. I have seen it in East Germany after the 1989 reunification, when people were running to Aldi to buy fruits, while tons were rotting on the trees. I have also seen it in Hong Kong, Shanghai, Singapore, now Malta. I came back from a walk with a few branches of Malva to make some tea at home. On the way I met a neighbor, let's call him George. He became excited when he saw my Malva branches and told me, that when he was a child, they ate the flowers with honey. "Do you want some, George?", I asked him. No thanks, I got some Coke in the fridge. 

Read More

Memento mori

Cemetraries are some of my favorite “hangouts”. They provide solitude, good perspective on many aspects of life, memories, tell stories and also say a lot about the local culture by how people treat their ancestors. Military graveyards additionally remind us of the nonsense and horrors of war. There is many of all this on the Capuccini Naval Cemetary. But what is special for me, is that here lies Henry Ernst Wild who survived the Shackleton expedition and then died of typhoid in Malta.

Capuccini Naval Cemetary, Kalkara (Malta)

Capuccini Naval Cemetary, Kalkara (Malta)

New Year Walk

Like every year, also 2019 started with a long walk. This time it was from Kalkara to Marsaskala, along the rocky coast and back; a bit more than 20 kilimeters. As of the strong wind from the New Year's night, the sea was rolling on the roks with high swell and in its typical turquoise color for sunny days in Malta. There is no better way than starting a new year like this. 

The long stretch of rocky coast from Kalkara to Marsaskala. 

The long stretch of rocky coast from Kalkara to Marsaskala. 

Coastal watchtower

Coastal watchtower

Sea rolling in on the watchtower

Sea rolling in on the watchtower

Senglea (Isla) on the way back home

Senglea (Isla) is the one of the "Three Cities" which involves the dockyards. This was the part of the Grand Harbour which was the center of British Naval ship maintenance and suffered consequently heavy damage during World War II. A lot if the region was abandoned and people were forced to move to the more rural areas, causing a lot of tension in the Maltese population which sometimes is still funnily present in some respect. Those who remained in the Grand Harbour region, specially in the South, had to live in ruins. The dock yards became a major employer, and rebuilding started. With the independence of Malta from British occupation (some call it "protection") this became the heartland of the Labour Party. Today, I personally think it is one of the most beautiful places on Malta. Sure, there is still a lot to do. But I rather see the potential than the deficits. 

DSCF3389, edited.jpg
DSCF3378, edited.jpg

Marsaxlokk Market

Spring is trying to make its break through in Malta. That means very changeable weather and also quite a bit of the well needed rain. We will be happy about it when the summer kicks in, as the water table is rising. I walked to the Marsaxlokk fish market along the coast from Kalkara. It takes about three hours one way, and is a very nice walk. I like the food section of the market, and of course specially the choices of fresh catch. Even Malta is in the Mediterranean, and you would think there should be supply of fresh food everywhere, there are in fact not many choices. One is the Marsaxlokk market on Sundays and then there is the farmer's market in Ta Qali and a small one in Birgu. Strangely the common food culture in Malta is very "English", even the traditional Maltese cuisine is excellent. My Sunday was filled with all together a 7 hours hike to get a fish back home, and all of it (hike and fish) was very nice.

20180218 path in south Malta.jpg
20180218 Marchaxlock fish trawlers 2.jpg
20180218 Tumbrelli.jpg

Les Contre-Sujet in the National Library of Malta

Today I had the rare opportunity to take a photo of my favorite work space in Malta: the National Library in Valletta. Normally, photography is strictly forbidden. But today, I did not go for work, but for pleasure, to attend a concert of the Malta Baroque Festival. So, I was not facing the librarian on duty - who is a wonderful person, helpful with any question you may have, but very strictly implementing the rules on weekdays for everybody's benefit. Today, on Sunday, I could turn to the security guard and ask: "It is so pretty. May I take a photo?" And I was answered proudly: "Okay. Quick!" So, that's the snapshot you see below.

An inside view of the National Library of Malta.

An inside view of the National Library of Malta.

The concert itself was a real pleasure, excellently performed and guided through. The ensemble was Les Contre-Sujet and they played mainly German Baroque composers (with one exception). I took the liberty to link in a photo of them from their website (below), as this illustrates nicely  the spirit they brought to these prestigious halls. I strongly suggest you have a look yourself and hope you have the chance to see and hear them performing. They even kept their humour when the Maltese version of Humpapa Music blended in from the street. I really liked it. The ensemble performing was Samuel Rotsztejn, Koji Yoda, Maya Enokida, Eric Tinkerhess and Takahisa Aida. 

Les Contre-Sujet (Photo  from their website  on 14.01.2018)

Les Contre-Sujet (Photo from their website on 14.01.2018)

Kalkara from a birdview

It was windy the first two days I arrived back to Kalkara, and there was the long awaited rain or which the island needs every drop. Still I took my DJI Spark drone and flew it in the breeze, cutting a few clips together with Camtasia. This is the production software I am going to use for my online statistics tutorials. It does need a bit of practice. But flying the drone in the wind needs more. 

Malta stopover

My stopover in Malta was very short, and my apologies to friends and colleagues for not catching up personally. But I will be back very soon so that we can gather in style. This time there were too many profane things to fix: internet access, a new SIM card since I lost my phone in China, dishwasher and the like. As you know these simple things take a lot more time in Malta than in other places. So time flew. Also, after being immersed in buzzing Hong Kong for two months, it also was a pleasure just to stroll along the rocky coast and watch the waves just by myself. 

IMG_20171216_121249.jpg

The heat is on

Kalkara is having a feast. It is the kind of annual celebration most towns and villages in Malta have in turns. It is a joyful one, with music, fireworks, food, wine and laughter. Communities here are local, but welcome all to join in. With the view on the neighboring towns or villages, all feasts tend to be more grand each year. And with respect to increasing altitude fireworks reach, the airport adjusts along the year its operational mode to stay out of the way. These days Malta is struck by some heat waves, pushing the mercury up to 44 degree Celsius. After noon until four all outdoor life gets quiet. Only the ones preparing the fireworks, are working under the boiling sun. The construction sites become very quiet during this season. I tried myself and it is impossible to move more that a few bricks, before longing for some shade. People in Malta are hard working. The reputation of Mediterranean lax does not apply here. Actually, I think it applies really nowhere in the Mediterranean. Not even in Libya. This myth must have been invented by people just coming and watch without feeling the heat themselves. For those who think austerity and discipline are the path to prosperity, yes (!), but just come and try to make a move outdoors when the sun stands high. Sure, there are a lot of things which can improve, no doubt. But working harder, is not one of them.

At the Kalkara waterfront. The village feast is on, but all is quiet during the day.

At the Kalkara waterfront. The village feast is on, but all is quiet during the day.

The construction site of Cospicua's Dock number one, which will become one of the campuses of the American University of Malta.

The construction site of Cospicua's Dock number one, which will become one of the campuses of the American University of Malta.

Fire works, after the show.

Fire works, after the show.

Village entrance to Kalkara.

Village entrance to Kalkara.

No brain to drain in Malta

Human Resources is not my field of expertise. But I thought somebody who is researching in this area might be able to make good use of some data collected in February 2017. We conducted a discussion on the undersupplied talent situation in Malta among and with industry representatives of the island state. This was in the context of a Business Forum hosted by the Faculty of Economics, Business, and Accounting of the University of Malta (FEMA). To have a starting point for the conversation, I polled opinions and assessments among 58 forum members. They represent indigenous Maltese commercial activities which are hiring University graduates. Main customers of these companies are Maltese end customer (46 %), foreign end customers (28 %), followed by Maltese B-B (11 %) and international B-B (9 %). 6 % are the supplier of an international mother company. Above 60 % of companies generate more than 50 % of their revenue in Malta. The results were confirming the views that there is a shortage of talent and that graduates are ill-equipped with the skills, capabilities, and characteristics required when they come to the job market. For those who are interested in this field, please feel free to download and use the summary presentation, the original data (sanitized from participant identities) , and the survey. Perhaps it is useful to compliment own research, or as a point of reference. In this context, there is also an interesting paper which shows that the situation is not new in Malta, but becomes more obviously a bottleneck now, during a sustained strong economic growth period. It is by Andrew Triganza Scott and Vincent Cassar (2005): The voyage from M.C.A.S.T. to industry. A perceived gap analysis of the critical competencies' evaluative dimensions in the manufacturing technical sector. Journal of Maltese Education Research. Vol. 3, Nr. 1, 43-60. I opened the comment function to this blog post. If you have any questions, please get in touch. 

Core slide.JPG

 

 

Swimmers only

Swimming season has begun. Given the strong wind we had the last few days, when I jump into my pool in Xgħajra, there are just two options: stay away from the rocks or break a few bones. The currents here are really strong here and it is better to have a pair of fins and jump into the deep water as far as possible. The waves can submerse you along the underwater cliff. The waves are a bit like day-trading at the stock market: rather unpredictable, but you get a feeling for the movement. But it can go still terribly wrong. And there is no "loss threshold" at which you can decide to get out. The good thing about this kind of coast is, that there are no beach tourists. They drown somewhere else in a Sangria bucket.

Malta habitat

Last night we had an information session for our EMBA Programme at the old University of Malta Campus in Valletta. Together with the National Library, these are my favorite academic "hang outs" in Malta. After that, a few went to The Bridge Jazz Bar down to the Grand Harbour, and enjoyed, over a drink, the lively atmosphere of an early summer Friday evening in Valletta. My habitat in Malta became the Grand Harbour area, the Three Cities and Valletta. The only transportation needed here is the Ferry from Cospicua to the Valletta Waterside. Of course, beside this, life in Malta is directed to the sea. 

Mendelssohn, Brahms, Edwards (?)

Yesterday night I took the opportunity to go to a small performance by the Malta Philharmonic Orchestra in the Robert Sammut Hall in Floriana. Nice programme, well performed, and I enjoyed also the information and guidance by Melanie Waite, who was leading through the evening. I had a little new discovery, which was a composition of the contemporary composer Ross Edwards. It was very Australian, in the sense that I could well imagine the vast space of the country. And also it became a bit repetitive in the end, which reminded me of the long drives through the Australian outback. I have to go back one day.

Caper season in Malta

Capers are flower buds of caparis spinosa, which are pickled in sea salt and vinegar for the use of seasoning of traditional Mediterrainan dishes, salads, fish and even pizzas. The season for picking them in Malta started mid April and now you very often see people with a bag or bowl standing in the bushes to pick their little harvest. The pickling in salt water (about 2 table spoons per 100 ml of water in a covered bowl) induces a fermentation process which produces mustard oil and a strong taste within 3-5 days. Then rinse the capers and store them in salt water. At later stage you can pick the caper berries, which are also etible and used in Mediterranan cuisine.

Caper bush flower and flower buds

Caper bush flower and flower buds

The flower of the caper bush is also caller Flinders' rose, named after the explorer Matthew Flinders (1774 - 1814).

The flower of the caper bush is also caller Flinders' rose, named after the explorer Matthew Flinders (1774 - 1814).

Sea salt is in Malta harvested in traditional salt pans which are carved into the limestone rock. Even I get my salt there and grind it in a Peugeot mill for use in the kitchen.

Sea salt is in Malta harvested in traditional salt pans which are carved into the limestone rock. Even I get my salt there and grind it in a Peugeot mill for use in the kitchen.

Summer colors

Beginning of April, on my way to the grocery behind the village, strolling through the secret gardens, there were yellow flowers covering large sports of rural Malta. Now summer is coming and the blossum is largely gone, making space for a hot and dry season. It is the time when life turns its focus from inland of the small island state towards the azur blue sea. Soon most vegetation which is not irrigated or a succulent will hibernate in a yellowish tone to welcome the next rain. This year, winter was quite generous with water and the spring was exceptionally colorful. But now the colors are changing.

Compare the colors with photos from the same location, not long ago by  clicking here .

Compare the colors with photos from the same location, not long ago by clicking here.

Hompesch gate in the background

Hompesch gate in the background

Gardens and markets

This year, thanks to ample rainfall in spring, local havests in Malta are good. There are two main farmer's market in Malta: one in Ta' Qali Attard (Tuesday 16:00 - 19:00, Saturday 9:00 - 17:00) and the other one at Birgu, St. Edward Street (Saturday, 7:00 - 12:00). This year's first local patatoes are available and grains will follow soon. Both markets have a decent supply of local vegetable and fruits. And of course such markets always teach you a lot about traditions and culture. It is good to see that the demand for such products is growing. The easy acess to junk food and degraded eating habits are already a public health issue in Malta. And also a success in local agriculture will return the value of agricultural and garden land, which otherwise turns too easy into a rubbish tip here.

Barley field, garden and fortress on the way to Rinella Bay.

Barley field, garden and fortress on the way to Rinella Bay.

View from the kitchen window.

View from the kitchen window.

Path through the Is-Sabbara Woodland between Ħaż-Żabbar and Bormla

Behind the house there is a path leading along thick fortification walls to a small land of pines, olive trees and secret gardens. It is still the green season in Malta. Soon, the temperatures will rise into a Mediterranean summer, and the colors will be dominated by the yellowish limestone. It is said that the village name "Zabbar" derives from the Maltese 'tiżbor', which means pruning trees and goes back to the Middle Ages. I have my own paths through Malta, which keep me away from the noisy and congested traffic. This is one of them. In Malta you have to connect the dots in your own way. And that's not just when looking at the map. 

Path through the Is-Sabbara Woodland

Path through the Is-Sabbara Woodland

A garden in the defense trench between Haz-Zabbar and Bormla.

A garden in the defense trench between Haz-Zabbar and Bormla.

Gallic Music for Cello & Piano

If you google "Gallic Music", you might end up with "Gaelic Music", which is about the Scottish equivalent of German humpapa music (better though). This is how the google algorithm, by following the masses, can put you on the wrong track. Of course you don't google anyways but you ixquick, if you don't want somebody advertising you the wrong music for the rest of you life.

When I bought myself a ticket to the Teatru Manoel for yesterday's performance of "Gallic Music for Cello & Piano", I just wanted to have something to ambulate to, between campus and home. Had no expectation. Then, it was great! Of course, I knew it would be Gallic (not Gaelic) and turned out to be an homage to La belle Epoque, in an extremely good interpretation. The cellist was Sebestian Hurtaud, a young man with a special style of expression with his instrument, and at the piano was Bruno Canino, who was of amazing lightness and you could feel the twinkle in the eye of a master who has "seen it all". It was also my first visit to the Teatru Manoel, built in 1731 by Antonio Manoel de Vilhena, Grand Master of the Knights of Malta. It is a wonderful wonderful place. 

I was thinking of how to illustrate this post graphically, and lacking an own photo, I took a painting of Giovanni Boldini in the spirit of La Belle Epoque, portraying the perhaps first "Supermodel" in history: Cleo de Merode. 

Giovanni Boldini (1901): Cleo de Merode. Perhaps the first "Supermodel" in history (Copyright creative commons)

Giovanni Boldini (1901): Cleo de Merode. Perhaps the first "Supermodel" in history (Copyright creative commons)